The Indie Path to Publishing

The last time I mentioned Rooted in the Sky and my efforts to get it independently published,* I had submitted it to Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill and Ashland Creek Press. We’re still waiting to hear back from Ashland, but Claire recently openedĀ  her mailbox to find a form rejection letter from Algonquin.

I’m not worried though. Rejection is inevitable. In the meantime, Rooted in the Sky has been submitted to:

Unbridled Books: estimated 10-week wait

Soft Skull Press: estimated 29-week wait

Graywolf Press: estimated 12 to 24-week wait

Elixir Press (2012 Fiction Award): Unknown wait time

Being a writer requires so.much.patience. The only thing to do is to keep busy by simultaneously submitting it to a slew of other publishers.

*Remember, when I say “independent publishing,” I’m not talking about self-publishing a book, but rather having a book published by an independent publisher. There’s a huge crowd of very respectable, smaller “independent” publishers who do all the publishing and distribution work, free of charge, and provide (small) advances and respectable royalties rates. It’s a mini version of getting published with one of the Big 6, without a literary agent acting as the go-between.

And the Countdown Begins

With a lovely, impressive, and revised query letter in hand, I officially submitted Rooted in the Sky to two indie publishers this week. Claire’s book is traveling through the US postal service as we speak to Algonquin Books–most famous for publishing Water for Elephants and Big Fish–and Ashland Creek Press, a small independent publisher that has some big love for literary fiction with environment, ecology, and wildlife themes (three themes which Claire’s book definitely contains).

Algonquin tells writers to expect a response within 8-10 weeks.

Ashland Creek Press promises to respond within 4-12 weeks.

In the meantime, I’m going to keep submitting the book to other indie publishers, but these were the two I was most excited about and needed to submit to ASAP. I think they’re the best fit for the book and, honestly, with Algonquin’s recent history of book-to-movie deals, what writer doesn’t occasionally dream of that kind of success?

Cross your fingers that we get an offer soon!